Nicole Caithness, with the BC Conservation Officer Service said bears are awake and hungry and coyotes will defend their dens if dogs or people approach.
She said the C-O-S is reminding residents that all of B.C. is bear country and it is an offense to feed or attract dangerous wildlife.
Garbage needs to be securely stored, bird feeders and pet foods should be removed, fruit should be picked off trees and bushes, dogs should be kept on a leash and people should carry bear spray when in forested areas.
As for regional news, Caithness said there was an incident to report on the Sunshine Coast.
“Sunshine Coast Conservation Officers partnered up with local fisheries officers to conduct a joint patrol targeting over-fishing and spring bear hunters in Jervis Inlet and the Egmont area.  Compliance was high with both fisheries and wildlife act regulations, however, three individuals were overcharged for an over-limit of rockfish.”
More people are out and about now that it’s warmed up outside and the Service is offering some guidance.
Caithness said many species of wildlife have recently given birth and seemingly orphaned wildlife should never be approached or handled.
“For example, does will often leave their fawns for hours at a time while they go and forage and the fawns rely on remaining still and odourless so as not to attract predators.”
Heading into the May long weekend, Caithness also has some advice for those planning to go out fishing.
“Anglers across Vancouver Island should be aware of new upcoming seasonal closures due to persistent low water levels.  Check online for new regulations or contact any CO office for details.”
She said bears are awake and hungry and coyotes will defend their dens if dogs or people approach.
Dogs should be on a leash and anyone heading out into forested areas should carry bear spray.